58.5% of American voters believe the winner of the election should appoint the next supreme court justice, poll finds

On September 18, 2020, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away at age 87. Her death came just 46 days from the presidential election on November 3rd, 2020. Now, it has become highly debated if President Donald Trump or the winner of the election should fill the court’s vacancy. 

Despite a spike in coronavirus cases among government officials, the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to hold four days of public hearings, beginning the week of October 12th to fill the Supreme Court Justice seat with Amy Coney Barrett

TapResearch wanted to understand U.S public opinion on who should fill the  Supreme Court vacancy. Our poll targeted 1,000 registered voters aged 18-64 with two disqualifying questions that establish a basic knowledge of the topic. The poll was launched 09/29/20 and completed in an hour with 642 responses. The full results can be found here. 

According to our poll, 34% of respondents do not know that Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a Supreme Court Justice and 35% of respondents do not know there are nine Supreme Court Justice positions. 

Our findings show that 58.5% of respondents believe the winner of the election should appoint the next supreme court justice.

“58.5% of Americans believe the winner of the election should appoint the next supreme court justice”

When we cross-compare the data by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, we see that 80.2% of Trump supporters think Trump should appoint the next Supreme Court Justice. On the other hand, 88% of Biden supporters think the next Supreme Court Justice should be appointed by the winner of the election.

A few big issues are at the forefront of American’s minds when it comes to filling this Supreme Court vacancy – Roe v. Wade and the Affordable Care Act. Therefore, we compared the respondent’s views on these topics to their view on who should fill the Supreme Court vacancy.

Our results show that 73.6% of respondents who support  Roe v. Wade think the winner of the election should fill the supreme court vacancy. Only 39% of respondents who support  Roe v. Wade believe Trump should appoint the next supreme court justice. 

Our poll shows that 78.7% of respondents who support the Affordable Care Act believe the winner of the election should fill the supreme court vacancy. With only 23.5% of respondents who support the Affordable Care Act want Trump should appoint the next supreme court justice.

Our result suggests that opinions on Roe v. Wade and the Affordable Care Act impact respondent’s views on who should fill the supreme court vacancy. Ultimately, a majority (58.5% of respondents) believe the winner of the election should appoint the next Supreme Court Justice, but the results are divided down political lines. 

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The poll was conducted on September 29, 2020, with 642 respondents. 

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

63.9% of American’s support for a candidate did not change as a result of the debate, poll finds

Last night, September 29th was the first 2020 presidential debate between Democrat candidate Joe Biden and Republican candidate Donald Trump. The debate last night amassed about 29 million total viewers. Many news outlets are calling the 90-minute Trump-Biden showdown chaotic and out of control, but what did American viewers think?

TapResearch wanted to gauge U.S public opinion on the candidate’s pre and post the debate. We surveyed 1,000 registered voters ages 18-64 who live in the United States. The full results of the pre-debate poll can be found here and the results of the post-debate poll can be found here. 

Here’s how we did it:

The pre-Presidential debate poll targeted 1,000 registered voters aged 18-64 with a single disqualifying question that asked if the respondent was planning to watch the debate. The poll was launched 09/29/20 at 4:45 pm PT and completed in an hour with 781 responses. 

The post-Presidential debate poll targeted 1,000 registered voters aged 18-64 with a single disqualifying question that asked if they watched the debate. The poll was launched  09/29/20 at 8:00 pm PT completed in an hour with 748 responses.

Only 22-25% of respondents in our polls did not or were not planning to watch the debates. Going into the debates 35.72% of respondents were confident Biden was going to win the debate compared to 24.84% of respondents who were confident that Trump was going to win the debate. 

Both our pre and post-debate survey showed that when deciding a “winner” of the debate coronavirus and the economy were the top issues on voter’s minds. 

When the data is broken down by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, 42% of Trump supporters listed the economy as the most important topic compared to only 12.59% of Biden supporters. 

Our poll suggested that the debate did not heavily sway voter’s support. 63.9% of respondents indicated that their support for a candidate did not change as a result of the debate. However, 9.36% of voters who were unsure changed to supporting Trump, and 15.37% of voters who were unsure changed to supporting Biden.

63.90% of voters indicated that their support for a candidate did not change as a result of the debate.

Both the pre and post-debate polls show that Trump supporters report themselves as “very likely” to vote at higher levels than Biden supporters. Approximately 75-76% of  Trump supporters indicated they are very likely to vote compared to 59-65% of Biden supporters.

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The two polls were conducted on September 29, 2020, with 1,000 respondents each. 

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

American’s opinions on the role of civil disobedience by athletes are divided down political lines, Poll finds

Professional athletes across America have been using their platforms to speak out publicly on racial unrest and protest against racismSparked by NBA player’s walkouts, civil disobedience in sports has become widely practiced by players.

Now, athletes from across the spectrum have been using their platforms to highlight civil unrest from NHL and  NASCAR allowing protests during the national anthem to Naomi Osaka, a tennis champion from Japan, wearing masks in memory of victims of police violence at the U.S Open. 

TapResearch wanted to gauge U.S public opinion on athlete’s protests and their impact on individual watching habits.  We surveyed 1,000 people ages 18-99 who live in the United States. The full results of this poll can be found here.

Our findings show that 56.22% of respondents believe it is “very acceptable” or “somewhat acceptable” for professional athletes to use their platform to speak out publicly about national issues.

When the data is broken down by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, 30.3% of Trump supporters think it’s “not at all acceptable” for professional athletes to use their platform to speak out publicly about national issues compared to 2.8% of Biden supporters.

30.3% of Trump supporters think it’s “not at all acceptable” for professional athletes to use their platform to speak out publicly about national issues compared to 2.8% of Biden supporters.

Our result suggests that younger generations like Gen Z and Millennials etc. (people aged 18-44)  feel that it is more important that athletes they support share their political views than it is for older generations like Baby Boomers and Silent (people aged 45-99). 

For instance, 63% of respondents aged 18-24  think it is “very important” or “somewhat important” that athletes they support share their political views compared to only 33% of respondents aged 55-64.

At the beginning of September, the highly anticipated NFL season started with racial injustice themes on display across the field. Many NFL players kneeled, locked arms, raised fists, or stayed off the field entirely during the national anthem as they opened their season. A year ago these player’s civil disobedience would not have been supported by the league like it has been in the recent weeks after an offseason marked by a global pandemic and civil unrest.  However, what is the U.S public support levels for these protests? 

Our poll suggests that feelings about NFL player’s protests are highly polarized among the U.S population with 29.2% of respondents strongly supporting and 27.7% strongly opposing. 

If we break it down by political affiliation we see that respondent’s opinions are divided down political lines. 49.97% of Biden supporters strongly support NFL player’s protests compared to 13.17% of Trump supporters inversely 52.1% of Trump supporters strongly oppose NFL player’s protests compared to 10.45% of Biden supporters.

If you apply these opinions into actions we see that the divide down political lines translates into the effect of player’s social activism on watching habits. 52.1% of Trump supporters plan to watch less sports and  34.79% of Biden supporters plan to watch more sports. 

Lastly, we asked respondents for their thoughts on if social activism in sports will be effective in helping achieve change in society. We found that 59.3% of respondents think that social activism in sports will be “very effective” or “somewhat effective” in creating change. 

Ultimately, our poll highlights a deep divide in opinions by political affiliation with Biden supporters supporting the merging of sports and social activism at higher levels than Trump supporters. 

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The two polls were conducted on September 15, 2020, with 1,0012 respondents each. 

If you’re a marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a survey about your brand across the TapResearch audience network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

[SURVEY] 45.8% of Americans believe that governments should enact laws to combat climate change

In the past few years, extreme weather events have become a daunting reality.  Many point to climate change as the main driver of recent extreme weather events like the wildfires in California and hurricane Laura in Louisiana

The debate on climate change within American society has become a contentious topic.  As extreme weather sweeps the nation, American’s perspective on climate change has grown to be a prevalent issue in the political arena.

With an upcoming election, TapResearch wanted to find out the U.S public opinion on extreme weather, global climate change, and the government’s role in creating environmental regulations. We surveyed 1,022 people ages 18-99 who live in the United States. The full results of this poll can be found here.

Our findings suggest that the majority of Americans – 67.3% – think climate change is happening. Only 16.3% do not believe in climate change.

When the data is broken down by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, 82% of Biden supporters believe climate change is happening compared to 52.9% of Trump supporters.

However, 30% of respondents think natural patterns contribute the most to climate change. Whereas,  56% attributed climate change to human activity.  If we look at these numbers by political affiliation 71.5% of Biden supporters think climate change is driven by human activity compared to 41.8% of Trump supporters.

A big discussion point in American politics today is the role the government should play in establishing protections against climate change. Approximately 45.8% of respondents believe that governments should enact laws to combat climate change. If we look at our data by voting plans for 2020 we see 63.9% of Biden supporters agree with enacting government climate laws compared to 30.6% of Trump supporters.

63.9% of Biden supporters agree with enacting government climate laws compared to 30.6% of Trump supporters.

Our research suggests respondent’s opinions on climate change are divided down political lines. Respondents who plan to vote for Biden believe in climate change and government climate policy intervention at higher levels than respondents who plan to vote for Trump.

 About the Poll
TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The survey was conducted on 08/28/20 with 1,022 respondents balanced to the U.S. Census.

TapResearch makes it radically easier to get powerful insights from any target audience. If you’d like access to the TapResearch Audience Network please contact michael@tapresearch.com