Poll: 55% of Users Won’t Allow Facebook to Track App and Web Activity for Better Ads or to Help Ad-Supported Businesses

IMAGE SOURCE: https://twitter.com/sal19

It’s no secret that Apple’s App Tracking Transparency framework is completely changing the way businesses access, track, and understand individual app user behaviors. The narrative from Apple has been clear and consistent: privacy should be a top priority, and users should have control over the data they share. But for companies like Facebook that have relied on user data to deliver successful ad experiences for years, this is only half the story. That’s why Facebook has decided to launch it’s own privacy prompt to users: one that explains exactly why tracking digital behaviors is important for the future of small businesses. 

This new prompt from Facebook, which has just been launched globally, states that if users allow tracking, they’ll, “get ads that are more personalized [and] support businesses that rely on ads to reach customers.” But is this argument enough to convince the average user that they should grant Facebook permission to track their activity across apps and websites? The data says no. In a recent survey conducted by TapResearch, 55% of respondents said that they were either unlikely or highly unlikely to allow tracking after reading this prompt from Facebook. 28% of these respondents polled use Facebook at least once a day, while 33% report logging into the app over three times a day—so it’s safe to say that a good portion of these daily active users value their privacy more than better ad experiences in the app. 

Those who responded to our question about tracking listed iPhones as their primary device, which gives us a small glimpse into how unpopular opt-in for tracking will be once Apple’s changes are implemented. However, age does play a role in a person’s willingness to be tracked based on the reasons that Facebook has presented. The data shows that the younger a user is, more open and/or accepting they are of the idea of sharing their private data: roughly 26% of 18-24 year olds and about 26% of 25-34 year olds stated that they’re likely or highly likely to allow tracking compared to just 16% of 35-44 year olds. 

When it comes to nudging more users in the direction of granting companies access to their data, it seems that Facebook and other advertisers have their work cut out for them. The data suggests that users may be open to sharing their digital activities for the right reason, but determining what that reason is is going to be a challenge. For instance, when asked if they would opt into tracking if it meant they could access their favorite apps for free, 38% of these users responded “Maybe,” while only 29% responded “Yes.” 

Moving Forward

With the deprecation of IDFA, ad networks like Facebook are being forced to rethink their strategies and learn how to navigate in a world without quick access to private data. Facebook’s privacy prompt will undoubtedly give them a preview of how users are going to respond to being in control of their data, and it’s evident that that will inform their approach for adapting to this shifting landscape. 

In the meantime, businesses dependent on ad revenue for growth should begin exploring alternatives. One viable solution is rewarded surveys. As a net-new revenue driver developed in response to the market research industry’s demand for quality insights from everyday app users, rewarded surveys offer mobile apps an avenue for monetization that does not require IDFA data or 3rd party tracking. With the aim to inform the future of business by collecting the thoughts, opinions, and sentiments of everyday app users in exchange for virtual currency,  surveys are an interactive, future-forward method for generating profit in a way that does not compromise app user experience. For a look at how popular mobile apps are using rewarded surveys today, check out how Socialpoint used them to increase average revenue per daily engaged user by 2.75x and find stability during the global pandemic. 

For more information about how rewarded surveys generate net-new profit for mobile apps, contact our monetization experts today.

Survey Methodology

TapResearch conducted this Facebook Consent survey across an audience network of random mobile users. The survey was conducted on February 2nd, 2021 and sent to 2,527 respondents in the U.S. 

Instagram vs. Reality

Last week, Instagram looked at types of pies mentioned in user feeds to see what is the most popular Thanksgiving pie by state. Here is the graphic they shared:

Looking at the data, we were surprised to see Cranberry Pie at the top choice for 14 states so we set out to confirm or disprove this map.

TapResearch conducted a survey on November 26, 2020 asking 15,800 Americans (ages 18-65) what their favorite pie to serve at Thanksgiving is. Here are our results:

Unlike Instagram, our survey data shows that the majority of Americans prefer pumpkin pie, with some states choosing pecan, sweet potato and apple pie. No state’s majority chose blueberry, cherry, strawberry or cranberry pie as their favorite. Our survey suggests that Instagram’s data was incorrect and that pumpkin pie, not cranberry pie, is America’s favorite Thanksgiving dessert. 

About this Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across their Audience Network of random mobile devices. The survey was conducted on November 26, 2020 shortly after the Apple Event with 15,800 respondents ages 18-65 distributed across each of the 50 states.

If you’re a marketer, journalist, or curious cat like me and would like to run a similar survey with TapResearch contact Michael Sprague at  michael@tapresearch.com

58.5% of American voters believe the winner of the election should appoint the next supreme court justice, poll finds

On September 18, 2020, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away at age 87. Her death came just 46 days from the presidential election on November 3rd, 2020. Now, it has become highly debated if President Donald Trump or the winner of the election should fill the court’s vacancy. 

Despite a spike in coronavirus cases among government officials, the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to hold four days of public hearings, beginning the week of October 12th to fill the Supreme Court Justice seat with Amy Coney Barrett

TapResearch wanted to understand U.S public opinion on who should fill the  Supreme Court vacancy. Our poll targeted 1,000 registered voters aged 18-64 with two disqualifying questions that establish a basic knowledge of the topic. The poll was launched 09/29/20 and completed in an hour with 642 responses. The full results can be found here. 

According to our poll, 34% of respondents do not know that Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a Supreme Court Justice and 35% of respondents do not know there are nine Supreme Court Justice positions. 

Our findings show that 58.5% of respondents believe the winner of the election should appoint the next supreme court justice.

“58.5% of Americans believe the winner of the election should appoint the next supreme court justice”

When we cross-compare the data by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, we see that 80.2% of Trump supporters think Trump should appoint the next Supreme Court Justice. On the other hand, 88% of Biden supporters think the next Supreme Court Justice should be appointed by the winner of the election.

A few big issues are at the forefront of American’s minds when it comes to filling this Supreme Court vacancy – Roe v. Wade and the Affordable Care Act. Therefore, we compared the respondent’s views on these topics to their view on who should fill the Supreme Court vacancy.

Our results show that 73.6% of respondents who support  Roe v. Wade think the winner of the election should fill the supreme court vacancy. Only 39% of respondents who support  Roe v. Wade believe Trump should appoint the next supreme court justice. 

Our poll shows that 78.7% of respondents who support the Affordable Care Act believe the winner of the election should fill the supreme court vacancy. With only 23.5% of respondents who support the Affordable Care Act want Trump should appoint the next supreme court justice.

Our result suggests that opinions on Roe v. Wade and the Affordable Care Act impact respondent’s views on who should fill the supreme court vacancy. Ultimately, a majority (58.5% of respondents) believe the winner of the election should appoint the next Supreme Court Justice, but the results are divided down political lines. 

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The poll was conducted on September 29, 2020, with 642 respondents. 

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

63.9% of American’s support for a candidate did not change as a result of the debate, poll finds

Last night, September 29th was the first 2020 presidential debate between Democrat candidate Joe Biden and Republican candidate Donald Trump. The debate last night amassed about 29 million total viewers. Many news outlets are calling the 90-minute Trump-Biden showdown chaotic and out of control, but what did American viewers think?

TapResearch wanted to gauge U.S public opinion on the candidate’s pre and post the debate. We surveyed 1,000 registered voters ages 18-64 who live in the United States. The full results of the pre-debate poll can be found here and the results of the post-debate poll can be found here. 

Here’s how we did it:

The pre-Presidential debate poll targeted 1,000 registered voters aged 18-64 with a single disqualifying question that asked if the respondent was planning to watch the debate. The poll was launched 09/29/20 at 4:45 pm PT and completed in an hour with 781 responses. 

The post-Presidential debate poll targeted 1,000 registered voters aged 18-64 with a single disqualifying question that asked if they watched the debate. The poll was launched  09/29/20 at 8:00 pm PT completed in an hour with 748 responses.

Only 22-25% of respondents in our polls did not or were not planning to watch the debates. Going into the debates 35.72% of respondents were confident Biden was going to win the debate compared to 24.84% of respondents who were confident that Trump was going to win the debate. 

Both our pre and post-debate survey showed that when deciding a “winner” of the debate coronavirus and the economy were the top issues on voter’s minds. 

When the data is broken down by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, 42% of Trump supporters listed the economy as the most important topic compared to only 12.59% of Biden supporters. 

Our poll suggested that the debate did not heavily sway voter’s support. 63.9% of respondents indicated that their support for a candidate did not change as a result of the debate. However, 9.36% of voters who were unsure changed to supporting Trump, and 15.37% of voters who were unsure changed to supporting Biden.

63.90% of voters indicated that their support for a candidate did not change as a result of the debate.

Both the pre and post-debate polls show that Trump supporters report themselves as “very likely” to vote at higher levels than Biden supporters. Approximately 75-76% of  Trump supporters indicated they are very likely to vote compared to 59-65% of Biden supporters.

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The two polls were conducted on September 29, 2020, with 1,000 respondents each. 

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

American’s opinions on the role of civil disobedience by athletes are divided down political lines, Poll finds

Professional athletes across America have been using their platforms to speak out publicly on racial unrest and protest against racismSparked by NBA player’s walkouts, civil disobedience in sports has become widely practiced by players.

Now, athletes from across the spectrum have been using their platforms to highlight civil unrest from NHL and  NASCAR allowing protests during the national anthem to Naomi Osaka, a tennis champion from Japan, wearing masks in memory of victims of police violence at the U.S Open. 

TapResearch wanted to gauge U.S public opinion on athlete’s protests and their impact on individual watching habits.  We surveyed 1,000 people ages 18-99 who live in the United States. The full results of this poll can be found here.

Our findings show that 56.22% of respondents believe it is “very acceptable” or “somewhat acceptable” for professional athletes to use their platform to speak out publicly about national issues.

When the data is broken down by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, 30.3% of Trump supporters think it’s “not at all acceptable” for professional athletes to use their platform to speak out publicly about national issues compared to 2.8% of Biden supporters.

30.3% of Trump supporters think it’s “not at all acceptable” for professional athletes to use their platform to speak out publicly about national issues compared to 2.8% of Biden supporters.

Our result suggests that younger generations like Gen Z and Millennials etc. (people aged 18-44)  feel that it is more important that athletes they support share their political views than it is for older generations like Baby Boomers and Silent (people aged 45-99). 

For instance, 63% of respondents aged 18-24  think it is “very important” or “somewhat important” that athletes they support share their political views compared to only 33% of respondents aged 55-64.

At the beginning of September, the highly anticipated NFL season started with racial injustice themes on display across the field. Many NFL players kneeled, locked arms, raised fists, or stayed off the field entirely during the national anthem as they opened their season. A year ago these player’s civil disobedience would not have been supported by the league like it has been in the recent weeks after an offseason marked by a global pandemic and civil unrest.  However, what is the U.S public support levels for these protests? 

Our poll suggests that feelings about NFL player’s protests are highly polarized among the U.S population with 29.2% of respondents strongly supporting and 27.7% strongly opposing. 

If we break it down by political affiliation we see that respondent’s opinions are divided down political lines. 49.97% of Biden supporters strongly support NFL player’s protests compared to 13.17% of Trump supporters inversely 52.1% of Trump supporters strongly oppose NFL player’s protests compared to 10.45% of Biden supporters.

If you apply these opinions into actions we see that the divide down political lines translates into the effect of player’s social activism on watching habits. 52.1% of Trump supporters plan to watch less sports and  34.79% of Biden supporters plan to watch more sports. 

Lastly, we asked respondents for their thoughts on if social activism in sports will be effective in helping achieve change in society. We found that 59.3% of respondents think that social activism in sports will be “very effective” or “somewhat effective” in creating change. 

Ultimately, our poll highlights a deep divide in opinions by political affiliation with Biden supporters supporting the merging of sports and social activism at higher levels than Trump supporters. 

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The two polls were conducted on September 15, 2020, with 1,0012 respondents each. 

If you’re a marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a survey about your brand across the TapResearch audience network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

New Poll Suggests Americans Are Still Concerned About Espionage in Chinese-owned Social Media Apps TikTok & WeChat

On Friday, the Trump administration announced that popular Chinese social media apps TikTok and WeChat would be banned from US App Stores. Additionally, WeChat faces other restrictions including a ban on transactions and internet hosting, which effectively make it unusable within the US.  

Over the weekend, TikTok made a deal with Oracle and Walmart that was approved by the Trump Administration, allowing them to continue their US operations and remain in US app stores. A federal judge blocked the WeChat ban, but the future of Tencent’s app is yet to be determined. 

TapResearch polled adults across the US to see how the general public felt about the security of foreign-owned apps, such as TikTok and WeChat immediately after the announcement on Friday. We surveyed 1,001 people ages 18-64 who live in the United States in 2 polls, one about WeChat (full results here) and one about TikTok (full results here). We previously polled users about TikTok on August 7, 2020, and you can read about those results here.

Our findings show that many people still support banning apps developed by foreign companies. In our August poll, only 30% of respondents answered that we should not ban any apps. The most recent data remains relatively constant with 34% of respondents saying we should not ban any apps and most respondents indicating that the US should either ban all foreign apps or at least apps from nations with an interest in spying on Americans. 

Should the US ban all apps developed in foreign nations?

Yes, only US-owned social media apps should be allowed for national security reasons (32%)

We should only ban apps from nations who have an interest in spying on Americans, such as Russia, China, etc. (35%)

No, we should not ban any apps (33%)

Similar to our previous poll, we asked if the respondents agreed with President Trump’s executive order banning TikTok in the US. While the largest segment of respondents (40%) indicated that they agree because the Chinese government is using TikTok to spy on Americans, this data is divided across political lines. Of respondents who plan to vote for Donald Trump in November, 70% agree with the executive order because “the Chinese government is using TikTok to spy on Americans”. Of respondents who indicated that they would be voting for Joe Biden, only 28% agreed with banning TikTok and 42% disagreed because “US-owned social media companies are also not secure”

When asked if the Trump Administration alone has the authority to ban an app like WeChat, the data suggests that most people believe the US government has the authority to ban an app, but the respondents are divided about if congressional approval is necessary. Again, this data suggests that the divide is down political lines. Of the respondents who plan to vote for Donald Trump, 66% say that an executive order alone is enough to ban WeChat from the app store, while 55% of respondents who plan to vote for Joe Biden say that congressional approval is necessary.

All in all, our poll suggests that many Americans continue to be concerned about foreign-owned social media apps using their technology for espionage. Our previous research on TikTok is consistent with these new findings as well as the latest poll into public opinion on banning WeChat. While Oracle and Walmart’s partnership with TikTok prevented a ban in the US, WeChat’s future is still uncertain. Our findings suggest that many people are concerned about foreign espionage through WeChat, but approval of an outright ban is divided across political lines.

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The two polls were conducted on September 18, 2020, with 1,001 respondents each. 

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

[SURVEY] 45.8% of Americans believe that governments should enact laws to combat climate change

In the past few years, extreme weather events have become a daunting reality.  Many point to climate change as the main driver of recent extreme weather events like the wildfires in California and hurricane Laura in Louisiana

The debate on climate change within American society has become a contentious topic.  As extreme weather sweeps the nation, American’s perspective on climate change has grown to be a prevalent issue in the political arena.

With an upcoming election, TapResearch wanted to find out the U.S public opinion on extreme weather, global climate change, and the government’s role in creating environmental regulations. We surveyed 1,022 people ages 18-99 who live in the United States. The full results of this poll can be found here.

Our findings suggest that the majority of Americans – 67.3% – think climate change is happening. Only 16.3% do not believe in climate change.

When the data is broken down by who Americans plan to vote for in the 2020 election, 82% of Biden supporters believe climate change is happening compared to 52.9% of Trump supporters.

However, 30% of respondents think natural patterns contribute the most to climate change. Whereas,  56% attributed climate change to human activity.  If we look at these numbers by political affiliation 71.5% of Biden supporters think climate change is driven by human activity compared to 41.8% of Trump supporters.

A big discussion point in American politics today is the role the government should play in establishing protections against climate change. Approximately 45.8% of respondents believe that governments should enact laws to combat climate change. If we look at our data by voting plans for 2020 we see 63.9% of Biden supporters agree with enacting government climate laws compared to 30.6% of Trump supporters.

63.9% of Biden supporters agree with enacting government climate laws compared to 30.6% of Trump supporters.

Our research suggests respondent’s opinions on climate change are divided down political lines. Respondents who plan to vote for Biden believe in climate change and government climate policy intervention at higher levels than respondents who plan to vote for Trump.

 About the Poll
TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The survey was conducted on 08/28/20 with 1,022 respondents balanced to the U.S. Census.

TapResearch makes it radically easier to get powerful insights from any target audience. If you’d like access to the TapResearch Audience Network please contact michael@tapresearch.com

Poll Suggests Using Foreign-Owned Social Media Apps for Espionage is a Concern for US Adults

On Friday, President Trump signed an executive order giving the popular social media app TikTok an ultimatum: be acquired by a US company or risk being banned from the US. 

While there have been other foreign apps with potential national security issues in the past, none have been as popular or garnered as much media coverage as TikTok. The WSJ recently reported that TikTok tracked user data in a way that was banned by Google but ended the practice in November 2019. Although there were concerns that the collected user data could be used by the Chinese government for “blackmail and espionage,” TikTok recently released a statement contesting these accusations, saying:

“We have made clear that TikTok has never shared user data with the Chinese government, nor censored content at its request. In fact, we make our moderation guidelines and algorithm source code available in our Transparency Center, which is a level of accountability no peer company has committed to. We even expressed our willingness to pursue a full sale of the US business to an American company.” 

TapResearch polled adults across the US to see how the general public felt about the security of foreign-owned apps, such as TikTok. We surveyed 1,003 people ages 18-64 who live in the United States and the full results of this poll can be found here.

Our findings show that many people support banning apps developed by foreign companies, with 40% of respondents indicating that the US should ban all apps from countries that have an interest in spying on Americans and another 30% of respondents saying that the US should ban all foreign social media apps.

“Should the US ban all apps developed in foreign nations?”

Yes, only US-owned social media apps should be allowed for national security reasons (30%)

We should only ban apps from nations who have an interest in spying on Americans, such as Russia, China, etc. (40%)

No, we should not ban any apps (30%)

When the data is broken down by age group, there’s a trend towards more aggressive action by older adults compared to the young adult population. Among 18 to 20-year-olds, 35% of respondents said we should not ban any apps from the US app store, compared to only 18% of adults aged 55 to 64. 

While many respondents supported banning foreign-owned apps for national security reasons, the majority (77%) conceded that even US-based social media companies can be infiltrated by foreign governments to spy on Americans. 

Finally, we asked if the respondents agreed with President Trump’s executive order banning TikTok in the US. While the largest segment of respondents (31%) indicated that they agree because the Chinese government is using TikTok to spy on Americans, this data is divided across political lines. Respondents who indicated that they were conservative were more likely to agree with the President’s order, compared to the liberal groups, where a larger proportion did not agree with the executive order.

In the slightly and very liberal groups, 37% and 39% of respondents, respectively, said “No [I do not agree], US-owned social media companies are also not secure”, compared to 16% of the very conservative group. In the very conservative group, 71% of respondents agreed with the order banning TikTok either because the app was used by the Chinese government to spy on Americans or because it will put pressure on Microsoft to acquire TikTok’s US business. 

All in all, our poll suggests that many Americans are concerned about foreign-owned social media apps using their technology for espionage. The example of TikTok, however, shows that although being spied on is a concern, President Trump’s response is not overwhelmingly popular and opinion varies across the political spectrum.

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The poll was conducted on August 7, 2020, with 1,003 respondents. 

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.

Will rewarded incentives help save opt-in ad tracking? New research suggests no

Written and Researched by: Lily Crawford, Brian Larson, David Nebenzahl

As we inch closer to the release date for iOS 14 there has been loads of speculation on how this will affect the advertising ecosystem. For an industry, the loss of IDFA may have dire consequences for ad targeting and attribution, including significant expected CPM decline. There is little doubt in many people’s minds that Google is not far behind with a similar announcement for GAID’s. 

What does this all mean? It’s a good question, and many of us are still guessing at what the fallout will look like. During an online webinar in July, Beeswax CEO Ari Paparo referred to it as the “IDFA Apocalypse”.

In a previous survey on IDFA we presented responses from iOS users asked if they would select “Allow Tracking” when presented with the proposed Apple notification. According to our research, 63% of people said they were unlikely or extremely unlikely to allow tracking.

Some companies have suggested that they would offer rewards in order to have users opt-in and “Allow Tracking”. Apple could provide some flexibility to developers which may increase the number of users who would opt-in, such as different language in the message or the ability to reward users. There is still no clarity from Apple if users can even be incentivized with a direct or indirect message to opt-in to ad tracking, but assuming it’s possible, would these incentives be enough to change users’ minds? We polled 1200 mobile Free to Play users, ages 18-54, in the US to find out. You can see the full results of our research here.

We found similar results to our previous IDFA research (full results here), with 85% of those surveyed saying that they would not allow tracking when asked to “Allow Tracking.” Next, we asked if an incentive, such as “50 Gems to Allow Tracking” would change the result. 

Our research found that even with this incentive, 67% of respondents would still “Ask App Not to Track”. Although some respondents changed their minds, the survey suggests that the majority of users may still opt-out of ad tracking.

When asked about ad tracking more broadly, the largest segment of respondents did not answer favorably. Any other similar ideas to incentivize users to opt-in will have to take into consideration this negative sentiment towards IDFA. The research suggests that un-rewarded consent may likely have low opt-in and rewarded consent may not significantly increase opt-in. In the end, publishers and developers will need to diversify their methods of monetization and user acquisition. 

About the poll:

TapResearch conducted this survey across their network of random mobile devices. The poll was conducted on August 5, 2020 with 1,201 respondents. Each respondent was a verified mobile user.

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com

Poll Shows Distrust in Vaccines Could Lead to Low Adoption of COVID-19 Vaccine

In every major media announcement about COVID-19, developing a vaccine is lauded as the key to return daily life back to normal. Researchers around the world are working around the clock to develop a vaccine in record time. 

One week ago, Moderna became the first US-based pharmaceutical company to have a successful Phase 1 vaccine trial. After a limited test with 45 participants, this experimental vaccine was shown to generate an immune response, and a final study with 30,000 participants will start at the end of the month. These early results are promising and if the next stages of the vaccine trials continue to show an effective immune response with no adverse effects, experts predict that this vaccine could be mass-produced in early 2021. 

On Tuesday, the New York Times released The Vaccine Trust Problem as part of their Daily podcast series. Jan Hoffman, the Times health reporter, reports that “I heard more and more from people who were beginning to say, you know, I get all my vaccines, I’m up-to-date — I will not take this one. These are pro-science, pro-vaccine people who are cringing and wanting to avoid this vaccine. And I thought, we have a problem.”

In this podcast, the Times is suggesting that a significant portion of the US population may not go get a vaccine, even if it’s widely available. Assuming a successful vaccine is developed, the question then becomes: How can we expect to go back to our expected normal way of life if adoption is not widespread? 

Wondering this ourselves, TapResearch ran a quick poll of adults across the US on July 21, 2020, to see how they felt about the progress of the COVID-19 vaccine trials. We surveyed 1,040 people ages 18-64 who live in the United States. The full results of this poll can be found here.

Our results were similar to the findings of the research referenced by the Times. The data suggests that a significant segment of the population would not plan to get a COVID-19 vaccine if one became available. Of the 1,040 respondents,  528 responded “Yes”, 266 responded “No”, and 246 responded “maybe” when asked if they planned to receive the vaccine. These results did not have any correlation to respondent age but were moderately correlated with education level. The data suggests that those with bachelor’s degrees or other advanced degrees would be more likely than other groups to plan to get a COVID-19 vaccine if it becomes available. 

Another interesting finding was that younger respondents would rather get Covid-19 instead of getting the vaccine and avoiding contracting the virus itself. 49% of respondents ages 25-34 would choose to get the virus compared to only 27% of those aged 55-64.

While early vaccine trials from around the world show promising results, our research supports claims by reporters that a significant portion of the US population may not plan to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Without widespread vaccination, it’s hard to pin our hopes of a “normal” life on the mass production of a successful vaccine alone.

About the Poll

TapResearch conducted this survey across its network of random mobile devices. The poll was conducted on July 22, 2020, with 1,040 respondents. 

If you’re a mobile marketer or decision-maker and would like to run a similar poll across the TapResearch mobile sample network please contact Michael Sprague at michael@tapresearch.com.